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Ad Attacks on Obamacare Continue

Posted on September 16, 2012 by admin

Children are hiding under their beds; their older siblings are checking their closets at night. Parents are shutting their eyes and ears out of sheer terror. Why? Because of Obamacare — the most effective boogeyman of our time. Congressmen, your parents, even your friends, wield it against you. Constantly, they rear the repulsive sound of its name, paralyzing you in fear. The country’s representatives claim it’s only adding to the uninsured, not subtracting. It’s driving up the premiums to unaffordable levels. By all accounts, it’s the next national crisis.

At this point, there’s no denying that you can’t have an election without some good old mudslinging. At least, that’s what kids today are taught.

With each election year, ads are taken out by candidates to boost their chances of reining in undecided votes. Coercive narrators compliment their impressive efforts. Celebrities show their support. Then – for good measure – the camp tapes a Kick Me sign to the competition’s back and the real games begins – without so much as a pseudo-sincere handshake.

Even with November still six months away, the process is already knee-deep in Phase Three. The month of May has opened its doors to two disgruntled Congressmen and their pleas for an Obamacare-free America.

Even with the bill thoroughly established, the clamors to defund Obamacare – to repeal Obamacare altogether – continue. They drone on. And the latest sound bite in this echoing argument is courtesy of Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) and company. Anyone that has subscribed to the representative’s newsletter was treated to the following tidbit just days ago: “For every Kentuckian that has enrolled in Obamacare, 40 have been dropped from their coverage.”

“Tell Rand your Obamacare story.”

Apparently, they left out the second part of the tag, which was likely something along the lines of: so that he can employ absurd statistics in his quest to instill fear in the American people. Supposedly, 168,000 is the number provided by the Kentucky Department of Insurance as it pertains to residents who have had their insurance policies cancelled. Given the original quote of the 40-to-1 issue, this would imply that only 4,200 Kentucky residents have enrolled in Obamacare.

A week ago, Governor Steve Beshear (D-KY) announced that the number was closer to a whopping 400,000.

Clearly, Democrats and Republicans don’t speak.

Another swing-and-miss in the finger-pointing department goes to Congressman Lee Terry (R-NE), who just a day before Rand Paul’s flub of epic proportions stirred a fallacy all his own. In his “Andrea’s Story” ad, his guest shares a heart-wrenching tale about her Obamacare dilemma — she has to pay an extra $300 per month for coverage, or be dropped altogether. From the somber tone of her voice to the evident sadness in Ms. Kodad’s eyes, the ad’s effective. It gets people talking. It’s just not accurate.

The Obama administration has worked with insurance companies to extend noncompliant policies until 2016. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska is one such compliant company. It’s also Andrea Kodad’s insurance provider.

The fear of Obamacare has engulfed the American people like wildfire, seemingly bottomless in its capacity for ferocity. And as these two attacks have evidenced, the opposed will always seek to capitalize on the term’s growing negative connotation. This is the boggling part. If Congressmen are searching in the bottom of the barrel for false arguments, how can the program’s approval rating be so low? It has its cons – of that, there is no doubt – but in the area of accessibility, there is no need to fear the fruits of the Affordable Care Act. Millions of Americans, though many were late to the game, are newly insured, and for those who currently have noncompliant policies as they relate to Obamacare, many can keep coverage for another few years until changes are necessary.

The Affordable Care Act’s opponents are at the top of their PR game though, and they know how to churn out manipulative advertisements that are created with viral marketing in mind.

Yes, the number of American citizens initially dropped from coverage was unsettling. But the Obama administration has urged changes to accommodate them once again.

Yes, premiums will rise in the foreseeable future when noncompliance is no longer tolerated, but today the ground is steady, as is the cost.

Obamacare, though controversial, though largely unpopular, is still just a toddler getting accustomed to walking. Now, more and more citizens are being insured. The marketplace has been improved. And solutions are being cooked up for the future problems. Furthermore, many of its shortcomings – such as its rushed glitch-riddled website – were simply a product of the desire to run.